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Title 9 of the California Code of Regulations section 10508

Part 1, Registers History, CCR T 9, Sec 10508

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Title 9 of the California Code of Regulations relates to rehabilitative and developmental services, with section 10508 addressing licensure of integral facilities.  (See Exhibit #1a)

 

These licensing regulations appear to have been first addressed in 1984 when the Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs scheduled public hearings regarding methadone licensing regulations.  (See Exhibit #2, page A-11)  Background information in the administrative filing of February 7, 1985 by the Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs provided a summary for the emergency actions being sought, as well as the intent of the new regulations, stating, in part:

 

The Department finds that there has been insufficient time since the passage of SB 2274 [1984] for the adoption of regulations through normal regulatory adoption procedures.  Alcoholism recovery facilities previously licensed by the Department of Social Services can no longer be licensed by the department of Social Services as of January 1, 1985.  Continued licensing is necessary to protect the public peace, health, safety, and general welfare of people receiving services from alcoholism recovery facilities.

 

The Department has developed emergency regulations which specify standards for physical environment of an alcoholism recovery facility, procedures to ensure health of facility personnel and residents, standards for food handling and storage, standards for accountability and recordkeeping, and general procedures regarding licensing, application, administrative actions and enforcement.  These are patterned after the Department of Social Services regulation and they will continue the protection of public peace, health, safety, and general welfare.

(See Exhibit #3, page 2)